Integrated Project Delivery (IPD): What, Why & Benefits

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Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) is a delivery model for complex construction projects focused on forming a single team of designers, builders, and owners through aligned incentives, culture and contract structure.

Hoylu asked Daniel Drouin, a recognized leader in IPD responsible for facilitating a suite of advisory services for collaborative-focused clients, a few questions about IPD. This is the first of a two-part Q&A with Daniel, who delivers direction and oversight through targeted workshops, training modules, IPD tools and process development, and contract execution. He also facilitates team organization to inform a tailored approach to onboarding, training, and cultural transformation. 


IPD Expert Daniel Drouin

Hoylu asked Daniel Drouin, a recognized leader in IPD responsible for facilitating a suite of advisory services for collaborative-focused clients, a few questions about IPD. This is the first of a two-part Q&A with Daniel, who delivers direction and oversight through targeted workshops, training modules, IPD tools and process development, and contract execution. He also facilitates team organization to inform a tailored approach to onboarding, training, and cultural transformation.

  

Q: What is Integrated project delivery (IPD)  

Drouin: Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a project delivery method in which all participants in a construction project collaborate and share risks and rewards in order to achieve a common goal. The goal of IPD is to improve project outcomes by increasing collaboration, communication, and integration among all stakeholders, including the owner, contractor, architect, engineers, and subcontractors. 

There are several key features of IPD that differentiate it from other project delivery methods: 

  1. Collaboration: IPD is based on the principle of collaboration among all stakeholders, including the owner, contractor, architect, engineers, and subcontractors. This collaboration is facilitated using a single contract, which includes all stakeholders and is signed by all parties at the beginning of the project. 
  2. Risk sharing: In IPD, all stakeholders share in the risks and rewards of the project. This helps to align the interests of all parties and encourage them to work together to achieve the best possible outcome. 
  3. Integrated Team: An IPD project typically includes a team of experts from a variety of disciplines, including architecture, engineering, construction, and operations. This team works closely together throughout the project to ensure that all aspects of the project are integrated and coordinated. 
  4. Early Stakeholder Involvement: IPD requires the early involvement of all stakeholders in the project, including the owner, contractor, architect, and engineers. This helps to ensure that all parties have a clear understanding of the project goals and can work together to achieve them. 
  5. Lean Design & Construction: IPD often employs Lean construction principles, which focus on maximizing value and minimizing waste. This helps to reduce costs and improve efficiency. 
  6. Technology: IPD often incorporates the use of technology, such as building information modeling (BIM), to improve communication and coordination among all stakeholders. 
  7. Continuous Improvement: IPD includes ongoing efforts to improve processes and systems, with the goal of achieving better project outcomes. 

 

Q: Why is it important to the industry?   

Drouin: Integrated project delivery (IPD) is a collaborative approach to the design, construction, and operation of a project. This method of project delivery focuses on collaboration and integration of tolls and processes between all stakeholders, including the owner, architect, engineer, contractor, subcontractor, and suppliers.  

This collaborative approach provides better communication and coordination, which leads to increased efficiency, cost savings, and project success.  

IPD is especially important for large and complex projects, where the number of stakeholders and their needs can be challenging to manage.  

Additionally, IPD can help to ensure that all parties involved are on the same page, which can help to reduce the likelihood of costly disputes or delays. 

 

Q: What are some of the benefits and what types of organizations will benefit from IPD? 

Drouin: Some of the benefits from IPD that any organization that will use IPD are: 

  1. Improved Quality: IPD enables the project team to work together to identify and resolve quality issues quickly and efficiently. 
  2. Cost Savings: IPD provides a streamlined process for project teams to work collaboratively to reduce costs and improve efficiencies. 
  3. Increased Collaboration: IPD encourages collaboration between team members and stakeholders, building trust and communication among them. 
  4. Improved Risk Management: IPD provides a framework for the project team to identify, assess, and control risks. 
  5. Improved Scheduling: IPD allows the project team to create a realistic and achievable timeline while providing visibility and control over the project schedule. 

  

Part 2 will address implementation of IPD and tools that can help. Stay tuned!  

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